This page has several sound files of
CONCERTINA MUSIC
which you may listen to.

(They are crude, being first efforts
and intended for demonstration, not entertainment.)

CAVEAT: This web site is under construction and may be expected to change radically in the near future. Among other things, this page may be reformatted, or its contents distributed among other pages. However, they should still be easy to find. The sound files themselves may also be replaced with updated versions, but I don't expect to delete any of them, only to add more.

I have just learned how use my computer to do recording, and the music files provided here are those results of my first few days' experimentation that I'm willing to let the public hear. These are not professional studio recordings. I used a single, cheap microphone and struggled for a comfortable position in front of my computer. There's no mixing or editing; still, on several of the examples I decided the first take was good enough. These are samples, to give an idea of a few of the things I do, though so far only a few. In particular, all of these recordings so far have been done using English system concertinas, no anglos or duets. I have divided the these examples into three groups: (1) traditional tunes, (2) traditional songs, and (3) tunes of my own composition.

I have decided to use 160 kB/s mp3 encoding rather than the 80 kB/s encoding, even though the latter takes only about half as much space, because the sound quality is noticeably better with 160 kB/s. Even my mistakes sound better. You should note that the file sizes range from 475 Kb to just under 5 Mb, and playing times from 25 sec. to over 4 min. On the other hand, I didn't feel that 320 kB/s made enough difference in sound to justify doubling the file size yet again.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: In addition to my own compositions, all arrangements presented here are my own and are subject to copyright. I hereby give my permission for anyone to play them in public or private at any time and even pass them on to others, subject to two conditions: (1) You should credit me as the composer of the tune or arrangement, and (2) you must not distribute them in any recorded form -- not in print, nor as audio recordings, nor as computer files or through posting on internet sites -- without getting separate permission from me. (3) Any one you pass them to must also agree to these three conditions.

Of course, these are courtesies you should extend to any composer or author.


Traditional tunes played on concertina.
Flowers of Edinburgh (1491 Kb)
Traditional Scottish reel.
Played on treble English concertina, twice through.
Harvest Home (2287 Kb)
Traditional Irish/English/Scottish/American hornpipe.
Played on treble English concertina, twice through.
Jamie Allen (1886 Kb)
Traditional Northumbrian polka, with some simple arrangement.
Played on treble English concertina, three times through.
Katies Rambles (1998 Kb)
Traditional jig. Irish, I guess. I learned this from notation by Henk van Aalten.
Played on treble English concertina, twice through.
Katies Rambles + harmony (2131 Kb)
Same as the above, but this time I tried improvising some harmony, and I think it worked.
Played on treble English concertina, twice through.
Laughing Banshee (774 Kb)
Traditional Irish jig. I learned this years ago from fiddler Dan Collins.
With a couple of notes different, it has other names, including Ryan's Jig.
Played on treble English concertina, once through.
Monk's March + Proudlock's Hornpipe (2458 Kb)
Traditional Morris dance tune + traditional Northumbrian hornpipe.
Played (almost) without harmony, to make it obvious they're really the same tune.
Played on treble English concertina, once through each tune.
South Wind (2082 Kb)
Traditional Irish air, often played as a waltz, but not here.
Played on treble English concertina, twice through, second time with harmony.

Traditional songs played with concertina accompaniment.
Elsie Marley (792 Kb)
Traditional Northumbrian song.
"Accompanied" on treble English concertina. 3 choruses & 2 verses.
Galway Bay (2262 Kb)
"Irish" song from the 1952 movie The Quiet Man.
Accompanied on treble English concertina. Two verses + once as instrumental.
Lyetyat Utki (Ducks Are Flying) (754 Kb)
Traditional Russian song.
Accompanied on bass English concertina. One verse.
The Molecatcher (636 Kb)
Traditional English.
Accompanied on treble English concertina. Two verses + choruses.
Paddy West (758 Kb)
Traditional sailor's ballad.
Accompanied on treble English concertina. One verse + chorus.
Rosin the Beau (773 Kb)
Traditional English/Irish/Scottish song.
Accompanied on treble English concertina. One verse, including the refrain bits.
Spotted Cow (475 Kb)
Traditional Irish song.
Accompanied on treble English concertina. One verse, including refrain.
Strike the Bell (1642 Kb)
Traditional sailor's song.
Accompanied on tenor-treble English concertina. Concertina once through, then one verse + chorus.
Wot Cher (1115 Kb)
Song from the English music hall tradition.
Accompanied on treble English concertina. One verse + chorus.
Za Lyesom (Beyond the Forest) (841 Kb)
Traditional Russian song.
Accompanied on treble English concertina. One verse.

A few of Jim Lucas' original compositions, played on concertina.
Blue Bonnet (754 Kb)
A polka. Simple, but one of my favorites. In G, but with some F-naturals.
The name? I started with the first few notes of an Irish song, "I Have a Bonnet Trimmed With Blue".
Played on treble English concertina, once through.
Marianne's Tune (3146 Kb)
Sort of medieval? Marianne was a coworker who shared some of my musical tastes.
Driving to work one morning, I thought of that, started whistling, and wrote this down when I arrived.
Played on treble English concertina, twice through plus an extra A part, to end on the minor.
Out of Circulation (2331 Kb)
What genre? You tell me.
Dedicated to three friends, but that's all I'll say.
Played on treble English concertina, twice through.
Ripe Brie (812 Kb)
A jig in G-minor. A friend asked me how I go about writing tunes. This was the result.
The name? I asked Rikke to name one of her favorite things.
Played on treble English concertina, once through.
Syv Roser (Seven Roses) (1457 Kb)
Another in G-minor, which I think might make a nice tune for a Playford-style dance.
I promised a cellist friend seven roses for her seventh birthday, when she turned 28.
But before going to the florist, I wrote her this tune.
Played on bass English concertina (which has the same range as a cello), once through.
Tak for Noret (Thanks for the Nor) (5026 Kb)
Played as an air, though I think it could also be played as a pols (a Swedish dance).
A Danish friend wrote a beautiful tune Morgen Over Noret (Morning Over the Nor), and learning it inspired me to write this for him.
The Nor is a large lake on western Sjślland (the island that includes Copenhagen), which Jens cycled past on his way to work.
Played on treble English concertina, once through, with harmony on a couple of the repeats.

If you have comments, criticisms, or suggestions regarding this web site or its contents,
you can email me by clicking here. ..... Jim